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Showing 1-10 of 18 products

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Sharpening Seminar at Viceroy Santa Monica

Tuesday, October 18, 2016 2:04:43 PM America/Los_Angeles

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Posted in News and Events By yoshihiro cutlery

The Types of Steel Used for Making Knives: An Overview

Wednesday, May 25, 2016 9:08:00 AM America/Los_Angeles

 

A knife is only as strong as its steel. While steel, in general, is an alloy of iron and carbon, it can take many different forms depending on what else the iron and carbon is combined with — along with how the steel is forged and what type of deoxidization process is employed...

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Posted in News and Events By Yoshihiro Cutlery

Sharpening Seminar at Ink - West Hollywood

Monday, May 23, 2016 1:22:00 PM America/Los_Angeles

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Posted in News and Events By Yoshihiro Cutlery

Sasabune

Tuesday, December 1, 2015 11:58:00 AM America/Los_Angeles

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Posted in News and Events By Yoshihiro Cutlery

Don’t ever hone your knife, treat it like a lady

Thursday, October 29, 2015 10:09:34 AM America/Los_Angeles

Often times our customers ask us a question, “Can I use a honing rod to sharpen my Yoshihiro Knife?” The answer is No, a resounding No. Let me explain why.Read More
Posted in Knives 101 By Kana Morita

Chef Michael Costa

Monday, October 19, 2015 1:22:00 PM America/Los_Angeles

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Posted in News and Events By Yoshihiro Cutlery

High-Carbon Steel Explained: White Steel, Blue Steel, and Super Blue

Wednesday, October 7, 2015 3:11:01 PM America/Los_Angeles

 

Steel is a compound of iron and carbon. Yet to be classified as high-carbon steel, it needs to have anywhere from 0.6% to 1.7% carbon by weight. For premium cutlery and knives, the higher carbon content is typically better. For one, higher carbon allows for a sharper cutting edge. To be considered stainless steel, the steel must have a chromium content of more than 12%. While all steel contains carbon, typically steels that do not contain chromium are referred to as carbon steels.

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Posted in News and Events By Yoshihiro Cutlery

The 3 Single-Edged Japanese Knives Every Chef Needs

Tuesday, September 22, 2015 5:09:17 PM America/Los_Angeles

 

When it comes to knife making, the Japanese have a long-standing belief of practicality. They value usability, meaning that traditionally the Japanese have made knives according to purpose. A specific knife would be made for every task.

While all of these knives have the same single-edged blade anatomy, they differ in areas of shape, size, and thickness of the blade — all for the purposes of their tasks at hand. Here are the three traditional Japanese knives we recommend that all chefs need for chopping vegetables, fileting and slicing fish:

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Posted in News and Events By Yoshihiro Cutlery

The Anatomy of The Japanese Single-Bevel Knife

Thursday, September 17, 2015 4:28:23 PM America/Los_Angeles

  

Traditionally, Japanese knives were single bevel, and featured the same grind with three key parts: the shinogi surface, the urasuki, and the uraoshi. It wasn't until Japan began modernizing in the late 19th century and early 20th century — and when they began incorporating western culture in to theirs — that they started crafting double beveled knives. The Japanese have continued to forge beautiful, sharp, and strategically designed single-edged knives that make slicing and dicing more efficient for any chef. To better understand how this is done, let’s explain the anatomy of a single-edged knife:

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Posted in Knives 101 By Yoshihiro Cutlery

Explaining Kitchen Knife Bevels and Edges

Wednesday, September 2, 2015 4:43:59 PM America/Los_Angeles

  

The bevel of a knife is one of the most important aspects that help to define its sharpness, strength, durability, and use. To put it simply, a bevel is the ground angle and shape of the blade’s edge, and depending on what it’s made of and how it’s ground, it can dictate the type of knife you have. Traditionally, the Japanese have knives that fall into two categories of bevels: a double bevel, or a single bevel. It’s common to also hear this referred to as a doubled-edged blade or a single-edged blade.

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Posted in Knife Care Essentials By Yoshihiro Cutlery

Showing 1-10 of 18 products

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