• Larry Monaco

  • Ei Hiroshi

    Profile Ei Hiroyoshi is a head chef at the Beverly Hills location of Sasabune. Before taking up this post, he spent over a dozen years developing his craft under the famed Sushi Chef Nobi Kusuhara, the founder of Sasabune. In Los Angeles the number of sushi bars is in the range of hundreds, but Sasabune is counted among the select few that LA residents would speak of when discussing restaurants where sushi could be experienced as an art form. The words an artist uses when talking about the instruments that they create with are infused with personality, character, and life. We talked to Ei Hiroyoshi, a veteran sushi chef with over a dozen years of experience working countless days with his instrument. A craftsman forged the piece of metal that became the knife that Chef Hiroyoshi uses at his sushi counter. Chef Hiroyoshi continues the forging process, but not of…
  • Michael Costa

    Michael Costa is Head Chef of Zaytinya, José Andrés’ award-winning restaurant in the Penn Quarter neighborhood of Washington, DC. Zaytinya specializes in mezze, “little dishes” that draw on the flavors of Greece, Turkey and Lebanon. Prior to joining José’s team, Michael was executive chef at Pazo, the Foreman Wolf Restaurant Group’s small plates restaurant in Baltimore. Under his direction, Pazo received a 3 ½ star review from the Baltimore Sun and earned a 3 Star rating the Mobile Travel Guide. With more than twelve years experience, Michael has cooked in several top kitchens, including turns at the Michelin-starred Restaurant Michel Rostang in Paris, France and Michel Richard’s Citronelle in Washington, DC where he served as private dining chef. In 2010 he was nominated “Chef of the Year” by the Maryland Restaurant Association for his work at Pazo. In 2009, he won “Best Wine Pairing” at the “A Taste of Elegance”…
  • Sam Nutter & Victor Wagman

    Bror is Danish for brother and the name of this restaurant in Copenhagen is embodied in the partnership of the two chefs who are at its helm. Sam Nutter and Victor Wagman started Bror after their years of friendship led them from the Vineyard at Stockross in England to being alums of Noma in Denmark. They continue to define themselves through the terroir of Scandinavia. Japanese Knives I love the respect that the Japanese have for their knives and the care they take in keeping them sharp. I think the rest of the world aspires to be like a Japanese chef when it comes to the respect they extend toward their knives. I use the Japanese knives that I received as a going away present from Noma. Beginnings I’m originally from England and when I was 13 years old I was chopping wood for a farmer in front of his…
  • Steven Gebhardt

    Humble Beginnings Chef Steven Gebhardt’s introduction to the culinary world was a fluke. During a summer job as a dish washer in a restaurant, he fell in love with cooking. As he describes it “cooking became my life”. After Culinary School, Chef Gebhardt made his way around the North East developing his skills in various cuisines from French to Japanese, landing at the famed Tibute under Chef Don Yamauchi. French Cuisine and Japanese Knives Whether it’s French cuisine or Japanese cuisine, in the end you are still using the knife to cut food-be it a cucumber, filet of fish, a terrine, etc. There are some projects that I will only use my Japanese single edge knives on and there are some that I will only use my double edge. Raw fish will only see the shine of my Deba and Kiritsuke knives, while any meat will be seeing my double…
  • Betty Fraser

    As Executive Chef and Co-owner of Grub in Los Angeles, Betty Fraser has established the Mecca of “California Comfort Food”, garnering praise since opening in 2001. Betty’s energy and enthusiasm might be best known from being a favorite on the second season of Bravo’s Top Chef and for her return appearances on Top Chef Masters. On Japanese Knives Japanese knives have a sleekness about them that really catches the eye. Not only are they beautiful to look at, but they have a sharper edge that allows for cleaner cuts. They are made from old traditions that have transcended time. Japanese cuisine focuses on the simplicity and elegance of the ingredients themselves. Many other cuisines work on melding flavors and blending new ingredients to create something that is surprising and unique to your palate. Japanese cuisine celebrates the singularity of a gorgeous piece of toro or a simple enoki mushroom. That…
  • Brendan Collins

    At the age of 15, Brendan Collins quit secondary school to follow his dream and enroll in culinary school, where he was classically trained in French technique. By 17, the talented Nottingham native had his first job at London's Le Gavroche, a Michelin two-star restaurant. He continued to hone his skills at several of London's finest gastronomic temples, including The Café Royal, The Heights, and Pied et Terre. Collins took on his first executive chef position at The Calls Grill in Leeds. Under his leadership, the fledgling dining room received the prestigious Michelin Bib Gourmand in 1999. Shortly thereafter, Collins returned to London to serve as sous chef at Oxo Tower Restaurant before accepting the position as sous for celebrity chef Marco Pierre White at Quo Vadis where Collins would garner one Michelin Star and earn a reputation as one of London's rising culinary stars. In 2002, at the behest…
  • James Avery

    On Japanese Knives In Japanese cuisine each knife has a very specific purpose. Utilizing those specific knives gives you the means to execute and fulfill the intention and vision you have for a particular preparation. I may use 3 different knives on 1 ingredient to achieve the results that I am looking for. As a chef I am drawn to the minimalist aesthetic of Japanese cuisine and the emphasis they place on quality ingredients and mastery of technique. Japanese knives are really just an extension of that mindset. If I had to choose my favorite knife it would be my Inox 300mm Sujihiki because I do most of the butchering and portioningwith it. I couldn’t work without it but choosing one over the other is like asking a parent which child is their favorite. In my opinion it gets to a point when your knives and all your tools literally…
  • Maison Giraud

    “In France eating out is like going out on an adventure, where people savor the chance to come together and eat and enjoy a bottle of wine”. -Chef Alain Giraud’s decades of experience in French cuisine, from the Michelin starred institutions of Paris to the bastions of California French are captured in the spirit of Maison Giraud of Pacific Palisades. Japanese Knives I was from a generation in France where you had the choice of either French knives or German knives. My first knife was a French paring knife. My dad was a chef and in his kitchen there was no shortage of knives of all varieties. I have a beautiful sushi knife that was given to me as a gift by Chef Michel Richard. I was his Chef de Cuisine for 8 years at Citrus. I staged for a couple of weeks before I accepted the job and I…
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